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  • apocalyptic archaeology

    Apocalyptic Archaeology features works that are depictions of a ruined world. The works are meditations on the brevity of life, and reveal the awareness of passing time, erosion and decay, and the ultimate deterioration of manmade artifacts, such as architecture, interiors, and landscapes.
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  • dreams and memories

    Dreams and Memories includes works that explore the intangible and inescapable realm of the psyche. The artists pose questions about the nature and meaning of recalled experiences, and about the way in which dreams and memories intersect and even morph from one level of consciousness to another.
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  • voyeurs/provocateurs

    Voyeur/Provocateurs includes subversively witty scenes-satirical commentaries on art, culture, and politics. These works make the viewer into Peeping Toms that spy on secret scenes.
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  • unnatural nature

    Unnatural Nature features work by artists that recreate natural environments using artificial materials and found objects which fool us into believing they are real places.view

category:  Voyeurs/Provocateurs
The Golden-Age Microbrewery

This artwork is on view at the Museum of Arts and Design in the exhibition Otherworldly: Optical Delusions and Small Realities.

An ancient family of dandies, sea captains, art connoisseurs, and amateur historians, the Chadwicks constructed The Golden-Age Microbrewery in the nineteenth century, during an upswing in interest in Dutch genre painting. The Chadwicks made the Microbrewery as a way to restage the events—brawls, drunken stumbles, epic serving accidents—that seem to have generated the array of mugs, tankards, and pewter dishes littering the foreground of so many golden-age Dutch paintings.

At the time the Chadwicks built this model, Dutch kitchens were popular in New York City clubs. The model is a careful reconstruction of the original at Chadwick Manor, undertaken by sculptor and art restorer J. Blachly and literary historian Lytle Shaw, editors of the Chadwick Family Papers.

Courtesy of Winkleman Gallery, New York

 

 

Materials: 

 

Wood, found objects, balsa wood, paint, fabric, plaster / Video